ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE

(Failure to submit the assignment on the scheduled date will entail a 10% reduction of points on the final points given.)
Important Dates:
• June 22 Discussion of final paper assignment; Discussion of research methods;
• June 23 Submit tentative bibliography I (minimum 25 sources)
• June 24 Writing the issue proposal and literature review
• June 25 Class presentation on topics
• June 26 Writing the abstract; tentative introduction and outline
• June 29 Writing the first draft
• June 30 Writingthe first draft. Email copy to me.
• July 1 Class presentation on research process
• July 2 Conferences
• July 3 Final paper due
I. The Final Research Paper

Plan, draft, and revise a 1500-2000 word essay (approx. 6-8 pages excluding the works cited section) that draws from at least 10 credible external sources to investigate multiple angles of a debatable issue in your major field.On the basis of your research and analysis, make a recommendation or argument to informed readers in that field.

Your essay should have the key features of academic or professional writing in your field that you have already identified:
• your issue question,
• evidence,
• sources,
• organization,
• style,
• format,
• and citations.
All of these should match the expectations of readers in your disciplinary audience.
It should have
• An introduction identifying the issue question
• A paragraph providing the background to your claim, the claim, and a blueprint/the main points of your paper
• A literature review
• Paragraphs that discuss each point, with topic sentence, appropriate evidence, introduction to the source, inclusion of source with appropriate citation, comment on the source, and a conclusion to the paragraph
• No instances of “sloppy writing”
• Appropriate transitions that connect sentences and paragraphs
• Appropriate punctuation and no spelling or grammatical errors
• An appropriate conclusion reiterating the claim and asserting the assumption

II. Audience, Purpose and Approaches
Audience:
When building your argument, you should write to academics in your field by attempting to enter an ongoing disciplinary conversation. You do this by: researching an issue within a specific set of journals; following the formats, strategies, and terminologies of these academic articles to establish common ground; and showing that you have done your homework on the issue and writing clearly and logically to establish ethos in that community.
Purpose:
When entering a disciplinary conversation, the point is not necessarily to win an argument but to contribute an idea, argument, or perspective to that conversation. The goal is to move the field one step further in its approach to a particular issue or problem.
Approaches:
Below are some possible places to start thinking about framing the issue you have been researching.
1. Warrants/Common Ground: Compare and contrast two opposing views on an issue and then come to your own conclusion. Determine which assumptions seem most reasonable given current circumstances and arguments in the field. You may come down on one side or the other, determine that both assumptions are correct or incorrect in certain ways, or argue for a common ground position between the two.
Examples:
• Library Automation: A Threat to Society?
• Genetically Modified Organisms
• Use of Nanotechnology in Cosmetics
• Stem Cell Therapy

2. Policy: Pick a problem that your fiel

d addresses or something you find problematic about your field and propose a solution to the problem. Maybe your discipline is rehashing the same arguments or perspectives and never coming to a conclusion, so it’s time to move on to other issues or ideas. Maybe it is too narrowly focused on one problem and isn’t open to seeing other ways of doing things, so it’s time to bring in other perspectives. In short, identify a problem surrounding your issue and argue for a solution.
Examples:
• Impact of IT in HRM Field
• Green Engineering
• Use of Tablets in Education
• Common GCC Currency
• Gene Therapy
3. Value: Pick a current argument, give ample details and support from a variety of sources and perspectives, and discuss why it is an important or valuable argument right now. Your sources for this should be as current as possible. You will need to situate the issue within a current rhetorical situation, and show explicitly how and why it is valuable now.
Examples:
• Designer Babies
• Replacing Robots in the Workplace
• Alternate Forms of Energy
• Genetically Modified Organisms
4. Other Possibilities: Since you have already been researching your issue, none of these approaches may be a good fit. Should you have another idea or angle on arguments within your field, feel free to run it by me. You will, however, need to pick something within your area of study and make an argument on or about it to the other people in your field.
Examples:
• Touch Technology
• Use of Microbes in Biotechnology
• Bluetooth Technology
• Success of Small Business
• Telemedicine
Important Criteria:
• Your paper should be no less than 6 full pages double-spaced and no more than 8.
• Your paper should have a Works Cited page with at least 10 sources (predominantly academic articles), but I expect more than the minimum number.
• Your paper should include at least 5 quotes in the text. The rest may be incorporated as paraphrases or summaries.
• Your paper should be in MLA or APA format and both Works Cited and in-text formats should be in MLA or APA.
• Your paper should have a title: often a concise summary of your claim not just the topic (try following some of the titling conventions of the articles you’ve researched).
• Your argument should be well researched and supported.
• Focus on basic paragraph construction—one topic or subclaim per paragraph with fully developed support.
• Focus on solid flow and transition—logical connections between sentences and paragraphs.

 

 
III. Bibliography Assignment (June 23)
This assignment will contribute significantly to your the Final Argument/Research Paper Consequently, it is very important that you do a good job gathering up material.
• Your final paper will deal with the content of the articles that you gather through research. You’ll build an argument about this topic through the rhetorical strategies you learned and the issues, arguments, and information you gather. Consequently, it is important to pick a topic that interests you enough to work with it. It should, however, be a topic that is current in your disciplinary field and responds to that audience.
• There should be a total of 25 entries in the final tentative bibliography, which should be organized with headers for these basic categories:
• 5 – databases (mention names)
• 10 – print journals, online journals, websites, and/or blogs (mention titles/sites)
• 10– books (4)and journal articles (6)
• This format not only allows you to gather research for your paper, but also provides a foundation for your future disciplinary work, since you’ll be discovering journals, databases, websites, and blogs that are important to your field.
There are differences among databases, journals, websites, and blogs that are important for research purposes:
• Databases: Databases are archives of articles from various journals/sources. Typically, these databases are compiled and edited by someone who knows the subject area—a librarian, an organization, or an editor/s. Most of the databases you will need you can reach through the library site. Other databases are put out on the web by individuals or organizations. All databases have some form of search function that compiles info via search terms.
• Print Journals: Journals are collections of articles that have gone through some editorial process, usually by an editorial board of professors within the field or discipline. Some print journals exist only in print and can be found on the library shelves. Other print journals are archived in electronic databases or on organizational websites. Also, many print journals will have websites that post their table of contents (even though they don’t have full text articles online). These are good for skimming and finding articles that you can then go get through the library.
• Online Journals: Online journals, strictly speaking, are journals that only exist electronically and have no print counterpart. They will have full text articles on their websites. Finding a good online journal or two in your field can be a great resource. Do some searches on Google to find journals in your field or look for online journals through the library site. Check out the online databases that are available to us.
• Websites: websites are informational sources typically posted to the web by individuals or organizations. Sometimes they will have databases, but most of the time they will have some posted articles or summaries, bibliographies, links pages, or syllabi (which are often good places to look for information). Most of these sites have not gone through an editorial process other than the one conducted by the person who maintains the site.
• Blogs: Blogs are websites that are typically maintained by individual writers or professors, though some are collaborative and written by many different people. The blogs will have dated entries and are updated often. Even though blogs are generally less formal, many professors discuss academic issues, sometimes at length. A key blog written by a reputable person in your field can be a good resource for current issues even though it hasn’t gone through a formal editorial process.
Sample Tentative Bibliography
XXXX
Aisha Ravindran
ENGL 302
Date
Tentative Bibliography
Databases:
1. “JSTOR Database. http://www.jstor.org/
Print journals, online journals, websites and/or blogs:
1. Simply Psychology <http://www.simplypsychology.org/naturevsnurture.html>
Books:
1. A.Pierce, Benjamin. “Pedigree Analysis, Applications, and Genetic Testing.”
Genetics: a Conceptual Approach. 4th ed. Howndmills-Basingstoke, England: W.H.Freemanand Company, 2012. 127-151. Print.
Journal Articles:
1. Kindler, Kenneth S., et al. “A Swedish National Twin Study of Lifetime
Major Depression.”The American Journal of Psychiatry 163 (2006): 109-114. Web.21 Nov 2013.
IV Issue Proposal (June 24)
• The Issue Proposal runs roughly one-page, single-spaced. Think through each category as much as you can, but approach this assignment as a brainstorming activity. Use it to generate ideas and focus your material.
• a. Write the issue in question form. (This doesn’t have to be as narrow as your main claim, but it might be a good idea to play around with it in statement form as well. Make sure the question and/or statement clearly establishes what key issue in your discipline you wish to address and what problem surrounds the issue. Is this a foundational issue for the field? Is it a current, pressing problem?)
• b. Explain why the issue is compelling to you and develop a clear claim. (Really spend some time thinking this one through. Be detailed and try to dig down and find some of your own assumptions that may rest at the bottom of your feelings about the issue and your desire to investigate it. You might relate this to your own experience, assuming that it is an exigence for your selection of this issue.)
• c. Describe what you already know about the issue and include a brief literature review. (Don’t be trite here. Again, spend some time thinking it through in detail. Trivial, obvious stuff won’t get you very far. Get past that. This is a brainstorming question to get you to work through everything you know from experience or prior knowledge. Having done research already, this will give you a chance to get a lot of it on paper concisely.)
• d. Explain what more you need to learn. (This seems to be the tricky one to me. How are you supposed to know what you don’t know yet? This takes a fair amount of thinking as well. You may need more data/facts/statistics, etc. That is probably the most obvious. You may–and probably will–need to learn more about the larger cultural context in which your field operates. Remember, any disciplinary interpretation rests on its relationship to cultural/historical context and disciplinary audience. Whatever you do, be detailed. Don’t just say you need more stats, say ‘about what’ and state ‘why’ that is relevant to your argument. Use some of the argument terms and concepts to brainstorm other things you might be leaving out.)
• e. Analyze your potential audience. (Who participates in this disciplinary field? What various positions on this issue exist in your field? What will persuade each side? Be sure your paper will address those who don’t necessarily agree with you. To avoid “preaching to the choir” it is very important to identify the people you will be writing to. Give some specific details–identify their assumptions/warrants/values.)
• f. Identify potential uses for ethos/pathos/logos. (How could each of these types of proof be utilized to support your position? Which ones do you think you are likely to use and why?)
• g. Identify the primary warrants involved in the issue. (Try to identify your values/assumptions and your audience’s. How could you use an understanding of these biases and beliefs to make your argument more effective? What do people assume about the issue? What do they agree on? What do they dispute? Why?)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
V. Sample Issue Proposal
XXXX
Dr. Aisha Ravindran
ENGL 302
Date
Research Proposal
Over the last decade, the concept of privatization has helped to evolve the world of business into a major force that connected various professional disciplines and individuals’ aspects of life. The controversial nature of privatization affects all individuals regardless of their involvement and relation to the field of business. Supporters of privatization believe that privatization is not only the force behind innovation but also the concept that will yield beneficial outcomes for years to come. Whereas, opponents of privatization believe that the concept of privatization leads to more harm than good. They claim that privatization is far too harmful and that its limitations should not be ignored. So, is privatization a phenomenon that leads to further growth and good future outcomes?
Therefore, specialists around the world are still trying to come up to a consensus whether the concept of privatization leads to a positive or negative impact on the world’s well-being (Bouché&Volden, 2011; Roland, 2008; Voncker, 2005). The literature on privatization often aims to determine components of privatization (Megginson, 2005) as well as, various methods that are used to adapt it (Filipovic, 2005). Such methods lead to different outcomes in terms of economic growth (Filipovic, 2005; Kallianiotis, 2009), social and human rights (Murthy, 2013; Klein, 2004) and innovation. Many researchers focus on specific geographical locations and provide an in depth analysis of privatization by taking into consideration cultural differences (Al-Omar, 1996; Köthenbürger, 2006).
As a business student and future contributing member of the society, I am interested to know if the concept of privatization is the right policy that governments need to utilize to ensure further growth and development. As well as, whether it will lead to a better social and business environment in the world. My area of study and work experience that I have done in the past allowed me to develop not only an understanding of what the concept of privatization is but also current economic situation. However, to insure reasonable conclusion to the issue at hand, I will need to do further research, read and gather evidence that will support my claim.
My main focus of investigation is to analyze both positive and negative aspects of privatization and to come up with a reasonable conclusion in favor of privatization. My research paper is targeted at individuals that would like to know more about privatization and opponents that are against utilization of privatization policy. In this paper I will use logos as a method of persuasion to focus on readers’ analytical and rational side when presenting factual evidence. My aim is to provide enough evidence in favor of privatization so that opponents and interested in the concept at the end will be able to draw their own conclusions that are supported by facts.

 

 

References
Al-Omar, F. (1996). Privatization in the Gulf Cooperation council (GCC) Countries: The Need and the Process. Islamic Economic Studies, 3(2), 35-55. Retrieved 26.04.2014, from http://www.isdb.org/irj/go/km/docs/documents/IDBDevelopments/Internet/English/IRTI/CM/downloads/IES_Articles/Vol 3-2..Fuad A Al-Omar..Privatization in the GCC..dp.pdf
Bouché, V., &Volden, C. (2011).Privatization and the Diffusion of Innovations. Journal of Politics, 73(2), 428-442. Retrieved from Ebsco Database. http:/ / doi:10.1017/S0022381611000041
Filipovic, A. (August, 2005). Impact of Privatization on Economic Growth.Issues in Political Economy,14, 12-34. Retrieved 25.04.2014, from http://org.elon.edu/ipe/Adi%20final.pdf
Megginson, W. L. (2005). The financial economics of privatization. New York: Oxford University Press.Retrieved from http://books.google.com/books.
Murthy, S.L. (2013). The Human Right(s) to Water and Sanitation: History, Meaning, and the Controversy Over-Privatization.Berkeley Journal of International Law. 2013,31 (1) ,89-149. 61. Retrieved from EBSCO Database
Kallianiotis, Ioannis N. (2009). European Privatization and its Effect on Financial Markets and the Economy from a Social Welfare Perspective.International Research Journal of Finance and Economics, 28. 66-85. Retrieved 26.04.2014, from http://storage.globalcitizen.net/data/topic/knowledge/uploads/20110908161937705.pdf
Köthenbürger, M., Hans-Werner, S., &Whalley, J. (2006). Privatization experiences in the European Union. Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press.Retrieved from http://books.google.com/books.
Klein, J. (2004). The Politics of Economic Security: Employee Benefits and the Privatization of New Deal Liberalism. Journal Of Policy History, 16(1), 34-65.Retrieved from Ebsco Database.
Roland, G. (2008). Privatization: successes and failures. New York: Columbia University Press.Retrieved from http://books.google.com/books.
Voncker, E. U. (2005). Limits to privatization: how to avoid too much of a good thing : a report to the Club of Rome. London: Earthscan.Retrieved from http://books.google.com/books.

 

 

 

 

 

 

VI. Presentations

SLO 5 Produce writing, including arguments and proposals, that is appropriate for a range of rhetorical situations with particular attention to textual features such as common genres; organizational strategies; style, tone and diction; and expected citation formats
Presentation I (5 minutes) on June 25
Prepare a brief presentation with at least two PowerPoint slides on your initial research process, based on your issue proposal. Participation points will be given for engaging in the class discussion and for asking relevant questions or providing support to the presenters. Address the following:

• The issue and the claim
• The tentative proposal (what is your argument?)
• The research plan
• Discuss any issues that you may have confronted as you commenced your research process.

Presentation II (5 minutes) on July 1

Your final presentation must provide a brief overview of the research process that you engaged in and should highlight the issues that you confronted, and a self-reflective evaluation of what you have gained from the process and from the course. It will include:

• Provide a brief overview of the research process that you engaged in.
• If you experienced any roadblocks or had to follow a different trajectory form your initial research plan, provide us with the details.
• What did you learn from this process? How will you use it for application in your academic and research pursuits? What are the skills and strategies that you have gained?

 

 

Presentation Rubric
Performance Area 3: Exceeds Standards 2: Meets Standards 1: Fails to Meet Standards P I
(50 Points) P II (50 Points)
Organization

20 Presenter follows logical sequence and provides explanations/ elaboration. Clear delineation and evaluation of research process is presented. Effectively summarizes the presentation and provides a sense of closure.
Presenter follows logical sequence, but fails to elaborate. Adequate delineation and evaluation of research process is presented. Provides an adequate summary &/or recommendation that is reasonable given the information/analysis presented. Presenter does not follow logical sequence (jumps around in presentation). Delineation and evaluation of research process is presented inadequately, with information missing. Weak or no conclusion provided (it is too vague to be of any practical value) or the recommendation is weakly related to the analysis.
Delivery
Presenter speaks clearly and loud enough for all in audience to hear, makes no grammatical errors, and pronounces all terms correctly and precisely. Presenter’s voice is relatively clear, but too low to be heard by those in the back of the room. Presenter makes several major grammatical errors, and mispronounces some terms. Presenter mumbles, mispronounces terms, and makes serious and persistent grammatical errors throughout presentation. Presenter speaks too quietly to be heard by many in audience.
Responsiveness

10
Addresses all questions in a manner that demonstrates a thorough command of the topic(s) of the presentation. Presenter demonstrates an ability to address most questions in a thoughtful and effective manner.
Presenter cannot address basic questions about the topic or addresses them in a superficial manner.
Multimedia Support and
Visual Aids(Not required for Presentation I)
10
Presentation includes a balanced use of appropriate multimedia that enhances the overall presentation (easy to read, attractive, informative, and error free). Presentation includes limited multi-media that enhance the overall presentation. Easy to read and informative, but not outstanding. Presentation includes little or no multimedia or uses it in distracting or ineffective manner (difficult to read, has errors &/or typos, etc.).

ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE

(Failure to submit the assignment on the scheduled date will entail a 10% reduction of points on the final points given.)
Important Dates:
• June 22 Discussion of final paper assignment; Discussion of research methods;
• June 23 Submit tentative bibliography I (minimum 25 sources)
• June 24 Writing the issue proposal and literature review
• June 25 Class presentation on topics
• June 26 Writing the abstract; tentative introduction and outline
• June 29 Writing the first draft
• June 30 Writingthe first draft. Email copy to me.
• July 1 Class presentation on research process
• July 2 Conferences
• July 3 Final paper due
I. The Final Research Paper

Plan, draft, and revise a 1500-2000 word essay (approx. 6-8 pages excluding the works cited section) that draws from at least 10 credible external sources to investigate multiple angles of a debatable issue in your major field.On the basis of your research and analysis, make a recommendation or argument to informed readers in that field.

Your essay should have the key features of academic or professional writing in your field that you have already identified:
• your issue question,
• evidence,
• sources,
• organization,
• style,
• format,
• and citations.
All of these should match the expectations of readers in your disciplinary audience.
It should have
• An introduction identifying the issue question
• A paragraph providing the background to your claim, the claim, and a blueprint/the main points of your paper
• A literature review
• Paragraphs that discuss each point, with topic sentence, appropriate evidence, introduction to the source, inclusion of source with appropriate citation, comment on the source, and a conclusion to the paragraph
• No instances of “sloppy writing”
• Appropriate transitions that connect sentences and paragraphs
• Appropriate punctuation and no spelling or grammatical errors
• An appropriate conclusion reiterating the claim and asserting the assumption

II. Audience, Purpose and Approaches
Audience:
When building your argument, you should write to academics in your field by attempting to enter an ongoing disciplinary conversation. You do this by: researching an issue within a specific set of journals; following the formats, strategies, and terminologies of these academic articles to establish common ground; and showing that you have done your homework on the issue and writing clearly and logically to establish ethos in that community.
Purpose:
When entering a disciplinary conversation, the point is not necessarily to win an argument but to contribute an idea, argument, or perspective to that conversation. The goal is to move the field one step further in its approach to a particular issue or problem.
Approaches:
Below are some possible places to start thinking about framing the issue you have been researching.
1. Warrants/Common Ground: Compare and contrast two opposing views on an issue and then come to your own conclusion. Determine which assumptions seem most reasonable given current circumstances and arguments in the field. You may come down on one side or the other, determine that both assumptions are correct or incorrect in certain ways, or argue for a common ground position between the two.
Examples:
• Library Automation: A Threat to Society?
• Genetically Modified Organisms
• Use of Nanotechnology in Cosmetics
• Stem Cell Therapy

2. Policy: Pick a problem that your fiel

d addresses or something you find problematic about your field and propose a solution to the problem. Maybe your discipline is rehashing the same arguments or perspectives and never coming to a conclusion, so it’s time to move on to other issues or ideas. Maybe it is too narrowly focused on one problem and isn’t open to seeing other ways of doing things, so it’s time to bring in other perspectives. In short, identify a problem surrounding your issue and argue for a solution.
Examples:
• Impact of IT in HRM Field
• Green Engineering
• Use of Tablets in Education
• Common GCC Currency
• Gene Therapy
3. Value: Pick a current argument, give ample details and support from a variety of sources and perspectives, and discuss why it is an important or valuable argument right now. Your sources for this should be as current as possible. You will need to situate the issue within a current rhetorical situation, and show explicitly how and why it is valuable now.
Examples:
• Designer Babies
• Replacing Robots in the Workplace
• Alternate Forms of Energy
• Genetically Modified Organisms
4. Other Possibilities: Since you have already been researching your issue, none of these approaches may be a good fit. Should you have another idea or angle on arguments within your field, feel free to run it by me. You will, however, need to pick something within your area of study and make an argument on or about it to the other people in your field.
Examples:
• Touch Technology
• Use of Microbes in Biotechnology
• Bluetooth Technology
• Success of Small Business
• Telemedicine
Important Criteria:
• Your paper should be no less than 6 full pages double-spaced and no more than 8.
• Your paper should have a Works Cited page with at least 10 sources (predominantly academic articles), but I expect more than the minimum number.
• Your paper should include at least 5 quotes in the text. The rest may be incorporated as paraphrases or summaries.
• Your paper should be in MLA or APA format and both Works Cited and in-text formats should be in MLA or APA.
• Your paper should have a title: often a concise summary of your claim not just the topic (try following some of the titling conventions of the articles you’ve researched).
• Your argument should be well researched and supported.
• Focus on basic paragraph construction—one topic or subclaim per paragraph with fully developed support.
• Focus on solid flow and transition—logical connections between sentences and paragraphs.

 

 
III. Bibliography Assignment (June 23)
This assignment will contribute significantly to your the Final Argument/Research Paper Consequently, it is very important that you do a good job gathering up material.
• Your final paper will deal with the content of the articles that you gather through research. You’ll build an argument about this topic through the rhetorical strategies you learned and the issues, arguments, and information you gather. Consequently, it is important to pick a topic that interests you enough to work with it. It should, however, be a topic that is current in your disciplinary field and responds to that audience.
• There should be a total of 25 entries in the final tentative bibliography, which should be organized with headers for these basic categories:
• 5 – databases (mention names)
• 10 – print journals, online journals, websites, and/or blogs (mention titles/sites)
• 10– books (4)and journal articles (6)
• This format not only allows you to gather research for your paper, but also provides a foundation for your future disciplinary work, since you’ll be discovering journals, databases, websites, and blogs that are important to your field.
There are differences among databases, journals, websites, and blogs that are important for research purposes:
• Databases: Databases are archives of articles from various journals/sources. Typically, these databases are compiled and edited by someone who knows the subject area—a librarian, an organization, or an editor/s. Most of the databases you will need you can reach through the library site. Other databases are put out on the web by individuals or organizations. All databases have some form of search function that compiles info via search terms.
• Print Journals: Journals are collections of articles that have gone through some editorial process, usually by an editorial board of professors within the field or discipline. Some print journals exist only in print and can be found on the library shelves. Other print journals are archived in electronic databases or on organizational websites. Also, many print journals will have websites that post their table of contents (even though they don’t have full text articles online). These are good for skimming and finding articles that you can then go get through the library.
• Online Journals: Online journals, strictly speaking, are journals that only exist electronically and have no print counterpart. They will have full text articles on their websites. Finding a good online journal or two in your field can be a great resource. Do some searches on Google to find journals in your field or look for online journals through the library site. Check out the online databases that are available to us.
• Websites: websites are informational sources typically posted to the web by individuals or organizations. Sometimes they will have databases, but most of the time they will have some posted articles or summaries, bibliographies, links pages, or syllabi (which are often good places to look for information). Most of these sites have not gone through an editorial process other than the one conducted by the person who maintains the site.
• Blogs: Blogs are websites that are typically maintained by individual writers or professors, though some are collaborative and written by many different people. The blogs will have dated entries and are updated often. Even though blogs are generally less formal, many professors discuss academic issues, sometimes at length. A key blog written by a reputable person in your field can be a good resource for current issues even though it hasn’t gone through a formal editorial process.
Sample Tentative Bibliography
XXXX
Aisha Ravindran
ENGL 302
Date
Tentative Bibliography
Databases:
1. “JSTOR Database. http://www.jstor.org/
Print journals, online journals, websites and/or blogs:
1. Simply Psychology <http://www.simplypsychology.org/naturevsnurture.html>
Books:
1. A.Pierce, Benjamin. “Pedigree Analysis, Applications, and Genetic Testing.”
Genetics: a Conceptual Approach. 4th ed. Howndmills-Basingstoke, England: W.H.Freemanand Company, 2012. 127-151. Print.
Journal Articles:
1. Kindler, Kenneth S., et al. “A Swedish National Twin Study of Lifetime
Major Depression.”The American Journal of Psychiatry 163 (2006): 109-114. Web.21 Nov 2013.
IV Issue Proposal (June 24)
• The Issue Proposal runs roughly one-page, single-spaced. Think through each category as much as you can, but approach this assignment as a brainstorming activity. Use it to generate ideas and focus your material.
• a. Write the issue in question form. (This doesn’t have to be as narrow as your main claim, but it might be a good idea to play around with it in statement form as well. Make sure the question and/or statement clearly establishes what key issue in your discipline you wish to address and what problem surrounds the issue. Is this a foundational issue for the field? Is it a current, pressing problem?)
• b. Explain why the issue is compelling to you and develop a clear claim. (Really spend some time thinking this one through. Be detailed and try to dig down and find some of your own assumptions that may rest at the bottom of your feelings about the issue and your desire to investigate it. You might relate this to your own experience, assuming that it is an exigence for your selection of this issue.)
• c. Describe what you already know about the issue and include a brief literature review. (Don’t be trite here. Again, spend some time thinking it through in detail. Trivial, obvious stuff won’t get you very far. Get past that. This is a brainstorming question to get you to work through everything you know from experience or prior knowledge. Having done research already, this will give you a chance to get a lot of it on paper concisely.)
• d. Explain what more you need to learn. (This seems to be the tricky one to me. How are you supposed to know what you don’t know yet? This takes a fair amount of thinking as well. You may need more data/facts/statistics, etc. That is probably the most obvious. You may–and probably will–need to learn more about the larger cultural context in which your field operates. Remember, any disciplinary interpretation rests on its relationship to cultural/historical context and disciplinary audience. Whatever you do, be detailed. Don’t just say you need more stats, say ‘about what’ and state ‘why’ that is relevant to your argument. Use some of the argument terms and concepts to brainstorm other things you might be leaving out.)
• e. Analyze your potential audience. (Who participates in this disciplinary field? What various positions on this issue exist in your field? What will persuade each side? Be sure your paper will address those who don’t necessarily agree with you. To avoid “preaching to the choir” it is very important to identify the people you will be writing to. Give some specific details–identify their assumptions/warrants/values.)
• f. Identify potential uses for ethos/pathos/logos. (How could each of these types of proof be utilized to support your position? Which ones do you think you are likely to use and why?)
• g. Identify the primary warrants involved in the issue. (Try to identify your values/assumptions and your audience’s. How could you use an understanding of these biases and beliefs to make your argument more effective? What do people assume about the issue? What do they agree on? What do they dispute? Why?)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
V. Sample Issue Proposal
XXXX
Dr. Aisha Ravindran
ENGL 302
Date
Research Proposal
Over the last decade, the concept of privatization has helped to evolve the world of business into a major force that connected various professional disciplines and individuals’ aspects of life. The controversial nature of privatization affects all individuals regardless of their involvement and relation to the field of business. Supporters of privatization believe that privatization is not only the force behind innovation but also the concept that will yield beneficial outcomes for years to come. Whereas, opponents of privatization believe that the concept of privatization leads to more harm than good. They claim that privatization is far too harmful and that its limitations should not be ignored. So, is privatization a phenomenon that leads to further growth and good future outcomes?
Therefore, specialists around the world are still trying to come up to a consensus whether the concept of privatization leads to a positive or negative impact on the world’s well-being (Bouché&Volden, 2011; Roland, 2008; Voncker, 2005). The literature on privatization often aims to determine components of privatization (Megginson, 2005) as well as, various methods that are used to adapt it (Filipovic, 2005). Such methods lead to different outcomes in terms of economic growth (Filipovic, 2005; Kallianiotis, 2009), social and human rights (Murthy, 2013; Klein, 2004) and innovation. Many researchers focus on specific geographical locations and provide an in depth analysis of privatization by taking into consideration cultural differences (Al-Omar, 1996; Köthenbürger, 2006).
As a business student and future contributing member of the society, I am interested to know if the concept of privatization is the right policy that governments need to utilize to ensure further growth and development. As well as, whether it will lead to a better social and business environment in the world. My area of study and work experience that I have done in the past allowed me to develop not only an understanding of what the concept of privatization is but also current economic situation. However, to insure reasonable conclusion to the issue at hand, I will need to do further research, read and gather evidence that will support my claim.
My main focus of investigation is to analyze both positive and negative aspects of privatization and to come up with a reasonable conclusion in favor of privatization. My research paper is targeted at individuals that would like to know more about privatization and opponents that are against utilization of privatization policy. In this paper I will use logos as a method of persuasion to focus on readers’ analytical and rational side when presenting factual evidence. My aim is to provide enough evidence in favor of privatization so that opponents and interested in the concept at the end will be able to draw their own conclusions that are supported by facts.

 

 

References
Al-Omar, F. (1996). Privatization in the Gulf Cooperation council (GCC) Countries: The Need and the Process. Islamic Economic Studies, 3(2), 35-55. Retrieved 26.04.2014, from http://www.isdb.org/irj/go/km/docs/documents/IDBDevelopments/Internet/English/IRTI/CM/downloads/IES_Articles/Vol 3-2..Fuad A Al-Omar..Privatization in the GCC..dp.pdf
Bouché, V., &Volden, C. (2011).Privatization and the Diffusion of Innovations. Journal of Politics, 73(2), 428-442. Retrieved from Ebsco Database. http:/ / doi:10.1017/S0022381611000041
Filipovic, A. (August, 2005). Impact of Privatization on Economic Growth.Issues in Political Economy,14, 12-34. Retrieved 25.04.2014, from http://org.elon.edu/ipe/Adi%20final.pdf
Megginson, W. L. (2005). The financial economics of privatization. New York: Oxford University Press.Retrieved from http://books.google.com/books.
Murthy, S.L. (2013). The Human Right(s) to Water and Sanitation: History, Meaning, and the Controversy Over-Privatization.Berkeley Journal of International Law. 2013,31 (1) ,89-149. 61. Retrieved from EBSCO Database
Kallianiotis, Ioannis N. (2009). European Privatization and its Effect on Financial Markets and the Economy from a Social Welfare Perspective.International Research Journal of Finance and Economics, 28. 66-85. Retrieved 26.04.2014, from http://storage.globalcitizen.net/data/topic/knowledge/uploads/20110908161937705.pdf
Köthenbürger, M., Hans-Werner, S., &Whalley, J. (2006). Privatization experiences in the European Union. Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press.Retrieved from http://books.google.com/books.
Klein, J. (2004). The Politics of Economic Security: Employee Benefits and the Privatization of New Deal Liberalism. Journal Of Policy History, 16(1), 34-65.Retrieved from Ebsco Database.
Roland, G. (2008). Privatization: successes and failures. New York: Columbia University Press.Retrieved from http://books.google.com/books.
Voncker, E. U. (2005). Limits to privatization: how to avoid too much of a good thing : a report to the Club of Rome. London: Earthscan.Retrieved from http://books.google.com/books.

 

 

 

 

 

 

VI. Presentations

SLO 5 Produce writing, including arguments and proposals, that is appropriate for a range of rhetorical situations with particular attention to textual features such as common genres; organizational strategies; style, tone and diction; and expected citation formats
Presentation I (5 minutes) on June 25
Prepare a brief presentation with at least two PowerPoint slides on your initial research process, based on your issue proposal. Participation points will be given for engaging in the class discussion and for asking relevant questions or providing support to the presenters. Address the following:

• The issue and the claim
• The tentative proposal (what is your argument?)
• The research plan
• Discuss any issues that you may have confronted as you commenced your research process.

Presentation II (5 minutes) on July 1

Your final presentation must provide a brief overview of the research process that you engaged in and should highlight the issues that you confronted, and a self-reflective evaluation of what you have gained from the process and from the course. It will include:

• Provide a brief overview of the research process that you engaged in.
• If you experienced any roadblocks or had to follow a different trajectory form your initial research plan, provide us with the details.
• What did you learn from this process? How will you use it for application in your academic and research pursuits? What are the skills and strategies that you have gained?

 

 

Presentation Rubric
Performance Area 3: Exceeds Standards 2: Meets Standards 1: Fails to Meet Standards P I
(50 Points) P II (50 Points)
Organization

20 Presenter follows logical sequence and provides explanations/ elaboration. Clear delineation and evaluation of research process is presented. Effectively summarizes the presentation and provides a sense of closure.
Presenter follows logical sequence, but fails to elaborate. Adequate delineation and evaluation of research process is presented. Provides an adequate summary &/or recommendation that is reasonable given the information/analysis presented. Presenter does not follow logical sequence (jumps around in presentation). Delineation and evaluation of research process is presented inadequately, with information missing. Weak or no conclusion provided (it is too vague to be of any practical value) or the recommendation is weakly related to the analysis.
Delivery
Presenter speaks clearly and loud enough for all in audience to hear, makes no grammatical errors, and pronounces all terms correctly and precisely. Presenter’s voice is relatively clear, but too low to be heard by those in the back of the room. Presenter makes several major grammatical errors, and mispronounces some terms. Presenter mumbles, mispronounces terms, and makes serious and persistent grammatical errors throughout presentation. Presenter speaks too quietly to be heard by many in audience.
Responsiveness

10
Addresses all questions in a manner that demonstrates a thorough command of the topic(s) of the presentation. Presenter demonstrates an ability to address most questions in a thoughtful and effective manner.
Presenter cannot address basic questions about the topic or addresses them in a superficial manner.
Multimedia Support and
Visual Aids(Not required for Presentation I)
10
Presentation includes a balanced use of appropriate multimedia that enhances the overall presentation (easy to read, attractive, informative, and error free). Presentation includes limited multi-media that enhance the overall presentation. Easy to read and informative, but not outstanding. Presentation includes little or no multimedia or uses it in distracting or ineffective manner (difficult to read, has errors &/or typos, etc.).