Christian Theology

Christian Theology
Carefully define the Key Terms using the McKim Text, The Westminster Dictionary of Theological Terms; textbook: The Mosaic of Christian Belief; other online, supplementary sources as desried.
Though most definitions can be located in The Westminster Dictionary of Theological Terms, Be aware that some definitions and explanations of Key Terms may be addressed and enhanced in our other textbook, The Mosaic of Christian Belief, in chapter 15 or other readings.
INSTRUCTIONS
1. Use the McKim text to define the following terms with the key terms below #2. Also use The Mosaic of Christian Belief.
eschatology
eschaton
apocalypse
apocalyptic
literature
already/not yet
parousia
consummation
new creation
rapture
resurrection
realized eschatology
existentialism
Tribulation Period
millennialism
Adventism
Futurism
preterist view
historicism
Premillennialism
Postmillennialism
amillennialism
Pretribulationism
Midtribulationism
postribulationism
2. Be sure to recognize, list, describe or identify Key Terms above #1 as associated with the descriptions below #2.
-A view first, suggested by Augustine, that the thousand years of Christ’s reign should be interpreted symbolically rather than literally.
-An outward sign instituted by God to convey an inward and spiritual grace.
-The study of the Church as a biblical and theological topic.
-An interpretive view of the book of Revelation that maintains all its prophecies have already been fulfilled and are past or were being fulfilled when the book was being written.
-An extreme form of devotion to a particular point of view, often quite narrowly defined and at variance from more widely held perspectives.
-The belief that Jesus Christ will return to earth prior to a period of one thousand years during which he will reign.
-A religious rite engaged in as a memorial or act of obedience.
-View popularized by C.H. Dodd and others, that New Testament eschatological passages do not have a future reference but are to be understood as being fulfilled in biblical times and especially in the life of the ministry of Jesus Christ.
-Views about the thousand year reign of Christ on earth that ends the present age.
-Study of the last things or the end of the world. Theological dimensions include the second coming of Jesus and the last judgment.
-The form of church government in which bishops oversee diocese.
-The belief that those not believing in Jesus Christ will be directly obliterated by God because of their sin.
-A form of church government in which governing authority is with the local congregation
-The Eschatological view that teaches Jesus Christ will return following the millennium: the thousand year reign mentioned in Revelation 20.1-7.
-A term for the Lord’s Supper deriving especially from Jesus’ prayer of thanks for the bread and wine, which he related to his body and blood given for those he loved.
-The ways by which God’s grace is extended and received by humans.
-The final event of history, considered by many theologians to be the return of Jesus Christ to earth.
-A view found in pre-millennialism, which teaches that, when Christ returns to the earth, believers will be raised from the earth to meet him in the air.
-A medieval view of the Lord’s Supper. While the substance of the bread and wine are not changed into the body and blood of Christ, they coexist or are conjoined in union with each other: bread with body and wine with blood.
-The future rising of all people from the dead at the final judgment.
-Belief in the Second Coming of Jesus Christ.
-The changing of the substance of the bread and wine, by God’s power, into the substance of Jesus Christ’s body and blood, which become present while the species remain.
-A term used for the coming of Christ, most usually focused on the second coming or future advent as mentioned in the Nicene Creed: "will come again."
-A form of church government where authority for decision making is in groups, composed of clergy and lay elders from local churches.
-A doctrine prominent in medieval Catholicism and taught in the Roman Catholic tradition. It is a place where souls of the faithful dead endure a period of purification and cleansing from sin prior to their entrance into heaven. It completes sanctification.
3. Thoroughly write about and describe the following concepts and phrases.
-List and describe the three main forms of church government.
-List the two realities that Christians have always believed in related to Christ?s future return.
-Identify the scriptural support for the for the Kingdom of God and the return of Christ with heavy emphasis on conflict, catastrophe, and extremes of good and evil in opposition with one another.
-Explain what is meant by the church as ?one, holy, catholic, and apostolic.?
-Using scripture references, explain how Paul links Christ?s bodily resurrection with the general resurrection of all the dead in the future.

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Christian Theology

Christian Theology
Carefully define the Key Terms using the McKim Text, The Westminster Dictionary of Theological Terms; textbook: The Mosaic of Christian Belief; other online, supplementary sources as desried.
Though most definitions can be located in The Westminster Dictionary of Theological Terms, Be aware that some definitions and explanations of Key Terms may be addressed and enhanced in our other textbook, The Mosaic of Christian Belief, in chapter 15 or other readings.
INSTRUCTIONS
1. Use the McKim text to define the following terms with the key terms below #2. Also use The Mosaic of Christian Belief.
eschatology
eschaton
apocalypse
apocalyptic
literature
already/not yet
parousia
consummation
new creation
rapture
resurrection
realized eschatology
existentialism
Tribulation Period
millennialism
Adventism
Futurism
preterist view
historicism
Premillennialism
Postmillennialism
amillennialism
Pretribulationism
Midtribulationism
postribulationism
2. Be sure to recognize, list, describe or identify Key Terms above #1 as associated with the descriptions below #2.
-A view first, suggested by Augustine, that the thousand years of Christ’s reign should be interpreted symbolically rather than literally.
-An outward sign instituted by God to convey an inward and spiritual grace.
-The study of the Church as a biblical and theological topic.
-An interpretive view of the book of Revelation that maintains all its prophecies have already been fulfilled and are past or were being fulfilled when the book was being written.
-An extreme form of devotion to a particular point of view, often quite narrowly defined and at variance from more widely held perspectives.
-The belief that Jesus Christ will return to earth prior to a period of one thousand years during which he will reign.
-A religious rite engaged in as a memorial or act of obedience.
-View popularized by C.H. Dodd and others, that New Testament eschatological passages do not have a future reference but are to be understood as being fulfilled in biblical times and especially in the life of the ministry of Jesus Christ.
-Views about the thousand year reign of Christ on earth that ends the present age.
-Study of the last things or the end of the world. Theological dimensions include the second coming of Jesus and the last judgment.
-The form of church government in which bishops oversee diocese.
-The belief that those not believing in Jesus Christ will be directly obliterated by God because of their sin.
-A form of church government in which governing authority is with the local congregation
-The Eschatological view that teaches Jesus Christ will return following the millennium: the thousand year reign mentioned in Revelation 20.1-7.
-A term for the Lord’s Supper deriving especially from Jesus’ prayer of thanks for the bread and wine, which he related to his body and blood given for those he loved.
-The ways by which God’s grace is extended and received by humans.
-The final event of history, considered by many theologians to be the return of Jesus Christ to earth.
-A view found in pre-millennialism, which teaches that, when Christ returns to the earth, believers will be raised from the earth to meet him in the air.
-A medieval view of the Lord’s Supper. While the substance of the bread and wine are not changed into the body and blood of Christ, they coexist or are conjoined in union with each other: bread with body and wine with blood.
-The future rising of all people from the dead at the final judgment.
-Belief in the Second Coming of Jesus Christ.
-The changing of the substance of the bread and wine, by God’s power, into the substance of Jesus Christ’s body and blood, which become present while the species remain.
-A term used for the coming of Christ, most usually focused on the second coming or future advent as mentioned in the Nicene Creed: "will come again."
-A form of church government where authority for decision making is in groups, composed of clergy and lay elders from local churches.
-A doctrine prominent in medieval Catholicism and taught in the Roman Catholic tradition. It is a place where souls of the faithful dead endure a period of purification and cleansing from sin prior to their entrance into heaven. It completes sanctification.
3. Thoroughly write about and describe the following concepts and phrases.
-List and describe the three main forms of church government.
-List the two realities that Christians have always believed in related to Christ?s future return.
-Identify the scriptural support for the for the Kingdom of God and the return of Christ with heavy emphasis on conflict, catastrophe, and extremes of good and evil in opposition with one another.
-Explain what is meant by the church as ?one, holy, catholic, and apostolic.?
-Using scripture references, explain how Paul links Christ?s bodily resurrection with the general resurrection of all the dead in the future.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *